Human Ignorance

One Yehovah God--One Spirit--One Truth:  http://ttimesofttrouble.webs.com/uncountablereligions.htm

Verses the mega uncountable religions and beliefs of man worldwide which = Deception

For anyone who believes in Yehovah God  - Their choices in belief would take a lifetime to learn the ways of because the god of this world is nothing but the father of lies who creates mislead accompanied with everything that goes against the only True YHVH of Eternity. 

 

https://dochub.com/timesoftrouble/pV1EQb/the-deceptions-of-satan-the-devil

  
List of Christian denominations (or Denominations self-identified as Christian) ordered by historical and doctrinal relationships. (See also: Christianity; Christian denominations; List of Christian denominations by number of members). Also, some groups included do not consider themselves a denomination (e.g., the Catholic Church considers itself the one true Church, and as pre-denominational). Regarding the use of the word "church," the Catholic Church does not consider any groups or denominations to be true "churches" unless they have maintained apostolic succession and observe the seven sacraments (by this definition, the Eastern Orthodox churches are, for the most part, the only other Christian groupings considered by the Catholic Church to be true "churches").

Some groups are large (e.g. Catholics, Lutherans, Anglicans or Baptists), while others are just a few small churches, and in most cases the relative size is not evident in this list. Also, modern movements such as Fundamentalist Christianity, Pietism, Evangelicalism, Pentecostalism and the Holiness movement sometimes cross denominational lines, or in some cases create new denominations out of two or more continuing groups, (as is the case for many United and uniting churches, for example). Such subtleties and complexities are not clearly depicted here. Additionally, some groups viewed by non-adherents as denominational actively resist being called a "denomination" and do not have any formal denominational structure, authority, or record-keeping beyond the local congregation; several groups within Restoration Movement fall into this category.

Note: This is not a complete list, but aims to provide a comprehensible overview of the diversity among denominations of Christianity. As there are reported to be approximately 38,000 Christian denominations, many of which cannot be verified to be significant, only those denominations with Wikipedia articles will be listed in order to ensure that all entries on this list are notable and verifiable.

Note: Between denominations, theologians, and comparative religionists there are considerable disagreements about which groups can be properly called Christian, disagreements arising primarily from doctrinal differences between groups. For the purpose of simplicity, this list is intended to reflect the self-understanding of each denomination. Explanations of different opinions concerning their status as Christian denominations can be found at their respective articles.

Note: There is no official recognition in most parts of the world for religious bodies, and there is no official clearinghouse which could determine the status or respectability of religious bodies. Often there is considerable disagreement between various churches about whether other churches should be labeled with pejorative terms such as "cult", or about whether this or that group enjoys some measure of respectability. Such considerations often vary from place to place, where one religious group may enjoy majority status in one region, but be widely regarded as a "dangerous cult" in another part of the world. Inclusion on this list does not indicate any judgment about the size, importance, or character of a group or its members.

Major divisions within Christianity. The different width of the lines (thickest for "Protestantism" and thinnest for "Oriental Orthodox" and "Assyrian Church") is without objective significance.

Contents

Catholicism

The Catholic Church considers itself the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church that Christ founded. As such, the Catholic Church does not consider itself a denomination, but as pre-denominational, the original Church of Christ.

 Orthodoxy

Main article: Eastern Orthodox Church

See also: Eastern Orthodox Church organization and Eastern Orthodox Christian theology

List provided in order of precedence. Indentation indicates autonomy rather than autocephaly.

Some Orthodox Churches with not universally recognized autocephaly by the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople:

The Eastern Orthodox Church considers itself to be the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church that Christ founded.

Protestantism

Main articles: Protestantism and Protestant Reformation

See also: Protestantism by country

These are the churches "which repudiated the papal authority, and separated or were severed from the Roman communion in the Reformation of the 16th cent., and of any of the bodies of Christians descended from them."[6]

Diagram showing major branches and movements within Protestantism


[edit] Pre-Lutheran Protestants

[edit] Lutheranism

Main articles: Lutheranism and Martin Luther

[edit] Anglicanism

[edit] Anglican Communion

Main article: Anglican Communion

See also: Anglicanism

Anglicanism has referred to itself as the via media between Roman Catholicism and Protestantism. It considers itself to be both Catholic and Reformed. Although the use of the term "Protestant" to refer to Anglicans was once common, it is controversial today, with some rejecting the label and others accepting it.

The Anglican Communion also includes the following united churches:

The Anglican Communion considers itself to be part of the One Holy catholic and Apostolic Church that Christ founded, without the implication that various other churches are not also branches of it.

[edit] Other Anglican Churches

Main article: Continuing Anglican movement

 

[edit] Reformed Churches

Main article: Reformed Churches

See also: Calvinism and First Great Awakening

[edit] Presbyterianism

Main article: Presbyterianism

See also: Presbyterian polity

[edit] Congregationalist Churches

Main article: Congregational Church

 

[edit] Anabaptists

Main article: Anabaptists

See also: Radical Reformation, Theology of Anabaptism, and Schwarzenau Brethren

[edit] Brethren

Main article: Brethren

·          

[edit] Methodists

Main article: Methodism

[edit] Pietists and Holiness Churches

Main articles: Pietism and Holiness movement

See also: Higher Life movement, Holiness Tabernacles, and Third Great Awakening

[edit] Baptists

Main article: Baptists

See also: Baptist beliefs and List of Baptist Confessions

Note: All Baptist associations are congregationalist affiliations for the purpose of cooperation, in which each local church is governmentally independent. The most prominent Baptist organizations in the United States are the American Baptist Association, tending to be more liberal, the National Baptist Convention, tending to be more moderate and the Southern Baptist Convention, tending to be more conservative.

Further information: List of Baptist sub-denominations

[edit] Spiritual Baptists

Note: The Spiritual Baptist Archdiocese of New York, Inc has congregationalist affiliations for the purpose of cooperation, in which each local church is governmentally independent.

[edit] Apostolic Churches – Irvingites

[edit] Pentecostalism

Main article: Pentecostalism

See also: List_of_Christian_denominations#Oneness_Pentecostalism

[edit] Charismatics

Main article: Charismatic movement

See also: Catholic Charismatic Renewal

[edit] Neo-Charismatic Churches

[edit] African Initiated Churches

Main article: African Initiated Church

[edit] United and uniting churches

Churches which are the result of a merger between distinct denominational churches. Churches are listed here when their disparate heritage marks them as inappropriately listed in the particular categories above.

Main article: United and uniting churches

[edit] Religious Society of Friends (Quakers)

Main article: Religious Society of Friends

Note: The Religious Society of Friends is historically considered a Protestant denomination. While Evangelical Friends and most members of the Friends United Meeting would consider themselves Protestant Christians, many Quakers today consider their faith to be a distinct, non-Protestant form of Christianity. Some Friends General Conference Quakers are "post-Christian" and some non-theists.

[edit] Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement

Main article: Restoration Movement

See also: Christian primitivism and Second Great Awakening

[edit] Southcottites

[edit] Millerites and comparable groups

 

The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the discussion on the talk page. Please do not remove this message until the dispute is resolved. (June 2011)

See also: List of Christian denominations#Bible Student groups

[edit] Sabbath-Keeping Churches, Adventist

[edit] Sabbath-Keeping Churches, Non-Adventist

Seventh-Day Baptists Seventh-Day Evangelist Church

[edit] Sunday Adventists

[edit] Sacred Name Groups

[edit] British-Israelism

Main article: British Israelism

[edit] Miscellaneous/Other


*Christian Revival Church India

[edit] Latter Day Saints

Main articles: Latter Day Saint movement and Mormonism

See also: List of sects in the Latter Day Saint movement

Most Latter Day Saint denominations are derived from the Church of Christ a break off from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints established by Joseph Smith, Jr. in 1830. The majority of "Prairie Saint" denominations were established after the death of Smith by the remnants of the saints who did not go west with Brigham Young. The Rocky Mountain denominations are various sects who broke from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints after its abandonment of polygamy in 1890. Other denominations are defined by either a belief in Joseph Smith as a prophet, or acceptance of the Book of Mormon as scripture. Mormonism is generally considered restorationist, believing that Smith restored the original Church of Christ to the Earth. Some Latter Day Saint denominations are regarded by other Christians as being nontrinitarian, but generally do not accept that label themselves, in contrast to the groups labelled "nontrinitarian" below.

[edit] "Original" denomination

[edit] "Prairie Saint" denominations

[edit] Rocky Mountains denominations

[edit] Other denominations

[edit] Oriental Orthodoxy

Main article: Oriental Orthodox Church

Oriental Orthodoxy comprises those Christians who did not accept the Council of Chalcedon (AD 451). Other denominations often erroneously label these churches "Monophysite", however, as the Oriental Orthodox do not adhere to the teachings of Eutyches, they themselves reject this label, preferring the term Miaphysite.

 

The Oriental Orthodox Church considers itself to be the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church that Christ founded.

The Church of the East, an Assyrian church, is said to have been formed by St Thomas. The Church did not attend the Council of Ephesus (AD 431). It is incorrectly referred to as Nestorianism; Assyrian Christians do not consider themselves Nestorians, and recent Christological agreements with the Catholic and some of the Orthodox churches have resolved this debate permanently, clearing the way for ecumenical relations.

[edit] Nontrinitarian groups

Main article: Nontrinitarianism

Various denominations whose self-understanding denies trinitarian theology held by other Christians.

[edit] Oneness Pentecostalism

Main article: Oneness Pentecostalism

[edit] Unitarianism and Universalism

Main articles: Unitarianism and Christian Universalism

See also: Unitarian Universalism

[edit] Bible Student groups

Main article: Bible Student movement

[edit] Swedenborgianism

Main article: Swedenborgianism

See also: The New Church

[edit] Other non-Trinitarians

[edit] Messianic Judaism

Main article: Messianic Judaism

See also: Messianic Movement and Messianic Jewish theology

[edit] Jewish Christians

[edit] Esoteric Christianity

Main articles: Esoteric Christianity and Western Mystery Tradition

See also: Johannine literature and Lazarus

[edit] New Thought

Main article: New Thought

See also: History of New Thought

The relation of New Thought to Christianity is sometimes murky; some of its adherents see themselves as practicing a true or correct form of Christianity, or as doing what Jesus did, while others, in particular, Religious Science says "yes and no" to the question of whether it considers itself Christian leaving it to the individual to define themselves.[7]

 

[edit] Syncretistic religions incorporating elements of Christianity

The relation of these movements to other Christian ideas can be remote. They are listed here because they include some elements of Christian practice or beliefs, within religious contexts which may be only loosely characterized as Christian.

[edit] See also

 

Christianity portal

[edit] References

1.                              ^ http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_20000806_dominus-iesus_en.html

2.                              ^ Christianity Today – General Statistics and Facts of Christianity Today

3.                              ^ Not to be confused with the Roman Rite, which is one of the Latin liturgical rites, not a particular Church.

4.                              ^ Anthony Dragani, From East to West

5.                              ^ "Responses to Some Questions Regarding Certain Aspects of the Doctrine on the Church". Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

6.                              ^ "Protestant, I.2.a" Oxford English Dictionary

7.                              ^ http://www.unitedcentersforspiritualliving.org/Philosophy/phil_faqs.php

8.                              ^ See http://divinesciencechurch.org/dsfed//ads.php for a description of basic beliefs, including its position as Christian.

9.                              ^ http://www.unitedcentersforspiritualliving.org/Philosophy/phil_faqs.php

10.                          ^ See the Unity Church FAQ at http://unity.org/aboutunity/whoWeAre/faq.html, in which Unity describes itself as "positive, practical Christianity", and thus is clearly self-identified as Christian.

[hide]v · d · ePart of a series on Christianity

 

 

 

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Books · Canon · Old Testament · New Testament · Gospels · Apocrypha

 

 

Theology

Apologetics · Baptism · Christology · God · Father · Son · Holy Spirit · History of theology · Mary · Salvation · Trinity

 

 

History and
tradition

Church Fathers · Early Christianity · Constantine · Ecumenical councils · Creeds ·
Missions · East–West Schism · Crusades · Protestant Reformation · Protestantism

 

 

Denominations
(List) and
Movements

Western: Adventist · Anabaptist · Anglican · Baptist · Calvinism · Evangelical · Holiness ·
Independent Catholic · Lutheran · Methodist · Old Catholic · Pentecostal · Quaker · Roman Catholic
Eastern: Eastern Orthodox · Eastern Catholic · Oriental Orthodox (Miaphysite) · Assyrian
Nontrinitarian: Christadelphian · Jehovah's Witness · Latter Day Saint · Oneness Pentecostal · Unitarian

 

 

Topics

Art · Criticism · Ecumenism · Liturgical year · Liturgy · Music · Other religions · Prayer · Sermons · Symbolism

 

 

 

Christianity portal

 

 

List of religions and spiritual traditions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following is a partial list of religions and spiritual traditions.

Contents

[hide]

 

Abrahamic religions

Main article: Abrahamic religions

A group of monotheistic traditions sometimes grouped with one another for comparative purposes, because all refer to a patriarch named Abraham.

Bábism

Main article: Bábism

Bahá'í Faith

Main article: Bahá'í Faith

See also: Bahá'í divisions

Christianity

Main article: Christianity

See also: List of Christian denominations

Catholicism

Main article: Catholicism

Protestantism

Main article: Protestantism

Other groups

Gnosticism

Main article: Gnosticism

See also: List of Gnostic sects

Christian Gnosticism

Early Gnosticism

Medieval Gnosticism

Persian Gnosticism

Syrian-Egyptic Gnosticism

Main article: Syrian-Egyptic Gnosticism

Islam

Main article: Islam

See also: Islamic schools and branches

Kalam Schools

Main article: Kalam

Kharijite

Main article: Kharijite

Shia Islam

Main article: Shia Islam

Sufism

Main article: Sufism

Sunni Islam

Main article: Sunni Islam

Other Islamic Groups

Judaism

Main article: Judaism

See also: Jewish Denominations

Rabbinic Judaism

Main article: Rabbinic Judaism

Karaite Judaism

Main article: Karaite Judaism

Modern Non-Rabbinic Judaism

Historical groups

Sects that believed Jesus was a prophet

Rastafari movement

Main article: Rastafari movement

Mandaeans and Sabians

Main articles: Mandaeism and Sabians

Samaritanism

Main article: Samaritanism

Unitarian Universalism

Main article: Unitarian Universalism

Indian religions

Main article: Indian religions

Religions that originated in India and religions and traditions related to, and descended from, them.

Ayyavazhi

Main article: Ayyavazhi

Bhakti Movement

Main article: Bhakti Movement

Buddhism

Main article: Schools of Buddhism

Din-i-Ilahi

Hinduism

See also: Hindu denominations

Major schools and movements of Hindu philosophy

Main article: Hindu philosophy

Jainism

Main article: Jainism

Sikhism

Main article: Sikhism

Iranian religions

Main article: Iranian religions

Manichaeism

Mazdakism

Yazdânism

Zoroastrianism

Mithraism

East Asian religions

Main article: East Asian religions

Confucianism

Main article: Confucianism

Shinto

Main articles: Shinto and Shinto sects and schools

Taoism

Main article: Taoism

Other

African diasporic religions

African diasporic religions are a number of related religions that developed in the Americas among African slaves and their descendants in various countries of the Caribbean Islands and Latin America, as well as parts of the southern United States. They derive from African traditional religions, especially of West and Central Africa, showing similarities to the Yoruba religion in particular.

See also: African diasporic religions

Indigenous traditional religions

See also: Paganism and Folk religion

Traditionally, these faiths have all been classified "Pagan", but scholars prefer the terms "indigenous/primal/folk/ethnic religions".

African

Main article: African traditional religions

West Africa

Central Africa

East Africa

Southern Africa

American

Main article: Native American mythology

Eurasian

Main article: Eurasian Indigenous Religions

Asian

European

Oceania/Pacific

Cargo cults

Main article: Cargo cults

Historical polytheism

Further information: Prehistoric religion and History of religion

Ancient Near Eastern

Main article: Ancient Near Eastern religions

Indo-European

Main article: Proto-Indo-European religion

Hellenistic

Main article: Hellenistic religion

Neopaganism

Main article: List of Neopagan movements

New Age, esotericism, mysticism

New Age

Main article: New Age

Esotericism and mysticism

Main articles: Esotericism and Mysticism

Occult and magical

Main articles: Occultism, Magic (paranormal), and Magick

Left-Hand Path

Main article: Left-Hand Path and Right-Hand Path

New religious movements

Main article: List of new religious movements

Creativity

Shinshukyo

Main article: Shinshūkyō

Fictional religions

Main article: List of fictional religions

Parody or mock religions

Others

Other categorisations

By demographics

Main article: Religious demographics

By area

Further information: Religion geography

See also

External links

[hide]v · d · eReligion topics

 

 

Major groups

Abrahamic

Bahá'í Faith · Christianity (Catholicism, Jehovah's Witness, Latter Day Saint movement, Orthodoxy, Protestanism, Unitarianism· Druze · Islam (Sunni, Shia, Sufi· Judaism (Conservative, Karaite, Orthodox, Reform)

 

 

Indian

Ayyavazhi · Buddhism (Theravada, Mahayana, Vajrayana· Hinduism (Shaktism, Shaivism, Smartism, Vaishnavism· Jainism · Sikhism

 

 

Iranian

Ahl-e Haqq · Bahá'í Faith · Manichaeism · Mazdak · Mithraism · Yazidi · Zoroastrianism (and Zurvanism)

 

 

East Asian

Confucianism · Shinto · Taoism · Zen

 

 

Yoruba

Aladura · Candomblé · Santería · Umbanda

 

 

Recent

Cao Dai · Cheondoism · Discordianism · I-Kuan Tao · Neopaganism · New Age · Rastafari · Scientology · Seicho-no-Ie · Tenrikyo · New Thought · Unitarian Universalism

 

 

Indigenous religion

African · Afro-American · Indigenous Australian · Chinese · Finnish-Estonian · Gurung · Javanese · Malagasy · Native American · Odinani · Philippine · Tibetan (Bön) · Polynesian · Vodou

 

 

Ancient religions

Prehistoric

Paleolithic

 

 

Near East

Egyptian · Mesopotamian · Semitic

 

 

Indo-European

Celtic · Germanic · Greek (Gnosticism · Neoplatonism· Illyro-thracian · Mithraism · Roman · Slavic · Vedic Hinduism

 

 

Turkic

Tengriism

 

 

Aspects

Apostasy / Disaffiliation · Beliefs · Clergy · Conversion · Deities · Denomination · Faith · God · Meditation · Monasticism (monk · nun· Mysticism · Mythology · Ordination · Orthodoxy · Orthopraxy · Ritual (liturgy · sacrifice· Spirituality · Supernatural · Symbols · Truth

 

 

Theism

Animism · Deism · Monotheism · Nontheism · Panentheism · Pantheism · Polytheism · Transtheism

 

 

Religious studies

Anthropology · Comparative · Development · Evolutionary origin · History · Philosophy · Psychology · Sociology · Theology · Theories · Women

 

 

Religion and
society

Agriculture · Business · Clergy (Monasticism · Ordination· Conversion (Evangelism · Missionary · Proselytism· Education · Fanaticism · Freedom (Pluralism · Syncretism · Toleration · Universalism· Fundamentalism · Growth · Happiness · Homosexuality · Minorities · National church · Neo-fascism · Political science · Populations · Schism · Science · State · Theocracy · Vegetarianism · Violence (Persecution · Terrorism · War· Wealth

 

 

Secularism
and irreligion

Deism · Agnosticism · Atheism · Criticism · Deconstruction · Irreligion by country · Secular theology · Secularization · Separation of church and state · Unaffiliated

 

 

 

Index · Outline · Timeline · Abrahamic prophets · Deification · Deities · Founders · Mass gatherings · New religious movements · Organizations · Religions and spiritual traditions · Scholars

 

Source for list above

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_religions_and_spiritual_traditions

 

About me

https://ttimesoftrouble.wordpress.com/about/  

https://ttimesoftrouble.wordpress.com/2016/07/10/539/  My Efforts for Spiritual Knowledge

https://dochub.com/timesoftrouble offers a good choice being many [over 230] individual reads on various subjects concerning the major mess America and our entire world civilization is truly in; and includes worldwide misled Christianity according to the Bible which has left billions not spiritually prepared for what is soon to become the worst timesoftrouble ever on this planet.

http://www.newworldordernews.com/ - accurate bad news so true people cannot believe.

http://www.blacklistednews.com/  - continual news reports on just how deranged our human race has become.

For anyone who believes in God---Their choices in beliefs would take a lifetime to learn the ways of because the god of this world is nothing but the father of lies who creates confusion accompanied with everything that goes against the only True God of Eternity.

 

List of Christian denominations

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


This article needs additional citations for verification.
Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2009)

List of Christian denominations (or Denominations self-identified as Christian) ordered by historical and doctrinal relationships. (See also: Christianity; Christian denominations; List of Christian denominations by number of members). Also, some groups included do not consider themselves a denomination (e.g., the Catholic Church considers itself the one true Church, and as pre-denominational). Regarding the use of the word "church," the Catholic Church does not consider any groups or denominations to be true "churches" unless they have maintained apostolic succession and observe the seven sacraments (by this definition, the Eastern Orthodox churches are, for the most part, the only other Christian groupings considered by the Catholic Church to be true "churches").[1]

Some groups are large (e.g. Catholics, Lutherans, Anglicans or Baptists), while others are just a few small churches, and in most cases the relative size is not evident in this list. Also, modern movements such as Fundamentalist Christianity, Pietism, Evangelicalism, Pentecostalism and the Holiness movement sometimes cross denominational lines, or in some cases create new denominations out of two or more continuing groups, (as is the case for many United and uniting churches, for example). Such subtleties and complexities are not clearly depicted here. Additionally, some groups viewed by non-adherents as denominational actively resist being called a "denomination" and do not have any formal denominational structure, authority, or record-keeping beyond the local congregation; several groups within Restoration Movement fall into this category.

Note: This is not a complete list, but aims to provide a comprehensible overview of the diversity among denominations of Christianity. As there are reported to be approximately 38,000 Christian denominations,[2] many of which cannot be verified to be significant, only those denominations with Wikipedia articles will be listed in order to ensure that all entries on this list are notable and verifiable.

Note: Between denominations, theologians, and comparative religionists there are considerable disagreements about which groups can be properly called Christian, disagreements arising primarily from doctrinal differences between groups. For the purpose of simplicity, this list is intended to reflect the self-understanding of each denomination. Explanations of different opinions concerning their status as Christian denominations can be found at their respective articles.

Note: There is no official recognition in most parts of the world for religious bodies, and there is no official clearinghouse which could determine the status or respectability of religious bodies. Often there is considerable disagreement between various churches about whether other churches should be labeled with pejorative terms such as "cult", or about whether this or that group enjoys some measure of respectability. Such considerations often vary from place to place, where one religious group may enjoy majority status in one region, but be widely regarded as a "dangerous cult" in another part of the world. Inclusion on this list does not indicate any judgment about the size, importance, or character of a group or its members.

Major divisions within Christianity. The different width of the lines (thickest for "Protestantism" and thinnest for "Oriental Orthodox" and "Assyrian Church") is without objective significance.

Contents

[hide]


[edit] Catholicism

Main article: Catholicism

These are the churches which claim continuity (based upon Apostolic Succession) with the early Church.

[edit] Catholic Church

Main article: Catholic Church

Catholic Church is composed of two rites; one is the western or latin rite, another is the eastern rite (i.e., Eastern Catholic Churches).

[edit] The Latin Rite

The Latin Rite or Church[3] is the largest and most widely known of the 22 Rites that together make up the Catholic Church.

[edit] Eastern Catholic Churches

Main article: Eastern Catholic Churches

All of the following are particular churches of the Catholic Church. They are all in communion with the Bishop of Rome and acknowledge his claim of universal jurisdiction and authority. They have some minor distinct theological emphases and expressions (for instance, in the case of those that are of Greek/Byzantine tradition, concerning some non-doctrinal aspects of the Latin view of purgatory).[4] The Eastern Catholic churches and the Latin church (which together compose the worldwide Catholic Church) share the same doctrine and sacraments, and thus the same faith.

The Catholic Church considers itself the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church that Christ founded.[5] As such, the Catholic Church does not consider itself a denomination, but as pre-denominational, the original Church of Christ.

[edit] Other churches

[edit] Independent (self-identified as Catholic)

See also: Sedevacantism

[edit] Orthodoxy

Main article: Eastern Orthodox Church

See also: Eastern Orthodox Church organization and Eastern Orthodox Christian theology

List provided in order of precedence. Indentation indicates autonomy rather than autocephaly.

Some Orthodox Churches with not universally recognized autocephaly by the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople:

The Eastern Orthodox Church considers itself to be the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church that Christ founded.

[edit] Protestantism

Main articles: Protestantism and Protestant Reformation

See also: Protestantism by country

These are the churches "which repudiated the papal authority, and separated or were severed from the Roman communion in the Reformation of the 16th cent., and of any of the bodies of Christians descended from them."[6]

Diagram showing major branches and movements within Protestantism


[edit] Pre-Lutheran Protestants

[edit] Lutheranism

Main articles: Lutheranism and Martin Luther

[edit] Anglicanism

[edit] Anglican Communion

Main article: Anglican Communion

See also: Anglicanism

Anglicanism has referred to itself as the via media between Roman Catholicism and Protestantism. It considers itself to be both Catholic and Reformed. Although the use of the term "Protestant" to refer to Anglicans was once common, it is controversial today, with some rejecting the label and others accepting it.

The Anglican Communion also includes the following united churches:

The Anglican Communion considers itself to be part of the One Holy catholic and Apostolic Church that Christ founded, without the implication that various other churches are not also branches of it.

[edit] Other Anglican Churches

Main article: Continuing Anglican movement

 

[edit] Reformed Churches

Main article: Reformed Churches

See also: Calvinism and First Great Awakening

[edit] Presbyterianism

Main article: Presbyterianism

See also: Presbyterian polity

[edit] Congregationalist Churches

Main article: Congregational Church

[edit] Anabaptists

Main article: Anabaptists

See also: Radical Reformation, Theology of Anabaptism, and Schwarzenau Brethren

[edit] Brethren

Main article: Brethren

·          

[edit] Methodists

Main article: Methodism

[edit] Pietists and Holiness Churches

Main articles: Pietism and Holiness movement

See also: Higher Life movement, Holiness Tabernacles, and Third Great Awakening

[edit] Baptists

Main article: Baptists

See also: Baptist beliefs and List of Baptist Confessions

Note: All Baptist associations are congregationalist affiliations for the purpose of cooperation, in which each local church is governmentally independent. The most prominent Baptist organizations in the United States are the American Baptist Association, tending to be more liberal, the National Baptist Convention, tending to be more moderate and the Southern Baptist Convention, tending to be more conservative.

Further information: List of Baptist sub-denominations

[edit] Spiritual Baptists

Note: The Spiritual Baptist Archdiocese of New York, Inc has congregationalist affiliations for the purpose of cooperation, in which each local church is governmentally independent.

[edit] Apostolic Churches – Irvingites

[edit] Pentecostalism

Main article: Pentecostalism

See also: List_of_Christian_denominations#Oneness_Pentecostalism

[edit] Charismatics

Main article: Charismatic movement

See also: Catholic Charismatic Renewal

[edit] Neo-Charismatic Churches

[edit] African Initiated Churches

Main article: African Initiated Church

[edit] United and uniting churches

Churches which are the result of a merger between distinct denominational churches. Churches are listed here when their disparate heritage marks them as inappropriately listed in the particular categories above.

Main article: United and uniting churches

[edit] Religious Society of Friends (Quakers)

Main article: Religious Society of Friends

Note: The Religious Society of Friends is historically considered a Protestant denomination. While Evangelical Friends and most members of the Friends United Meeting would consider themselves Protestant Christians, many Quakers today consider their faith to be a distinct, non-Protestant form of Christianity. Some Friends General Conference Quakers are "post-Christian" and some non-theists.

[edit] Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement

Main article: Restoration Movement

See also: Christian primitivism and Second Great Awakening

[edit] Southcottites

[edit] Millerites and comparable groups

 

The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the discussion on the talk page. Please do not remove this message until the dispute is resolved. (June 2011)

See also: List of Christian denominations#Bible Student groups

[edit] Sabbath-Keeping Churches, Adventist

[edit] Sabbath-Keeping Churches, Non-Adventist

Seventh-Day Baptists Seventh-Day Evangelist Church

[edit] Sunday Adventists

[edit] Sacred Name Groups

[edit] British-Israelism

Main article: British Israelism

[edit] Miscellaneous/Other

[edit] Christian Revival Church

*Christian Revival Church India

[edit] Latter Day Saints

Main articles: Latter Day Saint movement and Mormonism

See also: List of sects in the Latter Day Saint movement

Most Latter Day Saint denominations are derived from the Church of Christ a break off from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints established by Joseph Smith, Jr. in 1830. The majority of "Prairie Saint" denominations were established after the death of Smith by the remnants of the saints who did not go west with Brigham Young. The Rocky Mountain denominations are various sects who broke from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints after its abandonment of polygamy in 1890. Other denominations are defined by either a belief in Joseph Smith as a prophet, or acceptance of the Book of Mormon as scripture. Mormonism is generally considered restorationist, believing that Smith restored the original Church of Christ to the Earth. Some Latter Day Saint denominations are regarded by other Christians as being nontrinitarian, but generally do not accept that label themselves, in contrast to the groups labelled "nontrinitarian" below.

[edit] "Original" denomination

[edit] "Prairie Saint" denominations

[edit] Rocky Mountains denominations

[edit] Other denominations

[edit] Oriental Orthodoxy

Main article: Oriental Orthodox Church

Oriental Orthodoxy comprises those Christians who did not accept the Council of Chalcedon (AD 451). Other denominations often erroneously label these churches "Monophysite", however, as the Oriental Orthodox do not adhere to the teachings of Eutyches, they themselves reject this label, preferring the term Miaphysite.

 

The Oriental Orthodox Church considers itself to be the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church that Christ founded.

[edit] Assyrian Church

The Church of the East, an Assyrian church, is said to have been formed by St Thomas. The Church did not attend the Council of Ephesus (AD 431). It is incorrectly referred to as Nestorianism; Assyrian Christians do not consider themselves Nestorians, and recent Christological agreements with the Catholic and some of the Orthodox churches have resolved this debate permanently, clearing the way for ecumenical relations.

[edit] Nontrinitarian groups

Main article: Nontrinitarianism

Various denominations whose self-understanding denies trinitarian theology held by other Christians.

[edit] Oneness Pentecostalism

Main article: Oneness Pentecostalism

[edit] Unitarianism and Universalism

Main articles: Unitarianism and Christian Universalism

See also: Unitarian Universalism

[edit] Bible Student groups

Main article: Bible Student movement

[edit] Swedenborgianism

Main article: Swedenborgianism

See also: The New Church

[edit] Other non-Trinitarians

[edit] Messianic Judaism

Main article: Messianic Judaism

See also: Messianic Movement and Messianic Jewish theology

[edit] Jewish Christians

[edit] Esoteric Christianity

Main articles: Esoteric Christianity and Western Mystery Tradition

See also: Johannine literature and Lazarus

[edit] New Thought

Main article: New Thought

See also: History of New Thought

The relation of New Thought to Christianity is sometimes murky; some of its adherents see themselves as practicing a true or correct form of Christianity, or as doing what Jesus did, while others, in particular, Religious Science says "yes and no" to the question of whether it considers itself Christian leaving it to the individual to define themselves.[7]

[edit] Syncretistic religions incorporating elements of Christianity

The relation of these movements to other Christian ideas can be remote. They are listed here because they include some elements of Christian practice or beliefs, within religious contexts which may be only loosely characterized as Christian.

[edit] See also


Christianity portal

[edit] References

1.                              ^ http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_20000806_dominus-iesus_en.html

2.                              ^ Christianity Today – General Statistics and Facts of Christianity Today

3.                              ^ Not to be confused with the Roman Rite, which is one of the Latin liturgical rites, not a particular Church.

4.                              ^ Anthony Dragani, From East to West

5.                              ^ "Responses to Some Questions Regarding Certain Aspects of the Doctrine on the Church". Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

6.                              ^ "Protestant, I.2.a" Oxford English Dictionary

7.                              ^ http://www.unitedcentersforspiritualliving.org/Philosophy/phil_faqs.php

8.                              ^ See http://divinesciencechurch.org/dsfed//ads.php for a description of basic beliefs, including its position as Christian.

9.                              ^ http://www.unitedcentersforspiritualliving.org/Philosophy/phil_faqs.php

10.                          ^ See the Unity Church FAQ at http://unity.org/aboutunity/whoWeAre/faq.html, in which Unity describes itself as "positive, practical Christianity", and thus is clearly self-identified as Christian.

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Christianity portal

 

 

List of religions and spiritual traditions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following is a partial list of religions and spiritual traditions.

Contents

[hide]

Abrahamic religions

Main article: Abrahamic religions

A group of monotheistic traditions sometimes grouped with one another for comparative purposes, because all refer to a patriarch named Abraham.

Bábism

Main article: Bábism

Bahá'í Faith

Main article: Bahá'í Faith

See also: Bahá'í divisions

Christianity

Main article: Christianity

See also: List of Christian denominations

Catholicism

Main article: Catholicism

Protestantism

Main article: Protestantism

Other groups

Gnosticism

Main article: Gnosticism

See also: List of Gnostic sects

Christian Gnosticism

Early Gnosticism

Medieval Gnosticism

Persian Gnosticism

Syrian-Egyptic Gnosticism

Main article: Syrian-Egyptic Gnosticism

Islam

Main article: Islam

See also: Islamic schools and branches

Kalam Schools

Main article: Kalam

Kharijite

Main article: Kharijite

Shia Islam

Main article: Shia Islam

Sufism

Main article: Sufism

Sunni Islam

Main article: Sunni Islam

Other Islamic Groups

Judaism

Main article: Judaism

See also: Jewish Denominations

Rabbinic Judaism

Main article: Rabbinic Judaism

Karaite Judaism

Main article: Karaite Judaism

Modern Non-Rabbinic Judaism

Historical groups

Sects that believed Jesus was a prophet

Rastafari movement

Main article: Rastafari movement

Mandaeans and Sabians

Main articles: Mandaeism and Sabians

Samaritanism

Main article: Samaritanism

Unitarian Universalism

Main article: Unitarian Universalism

Indian religions

Main article: Indian religions

Religions that originated in India and religions and traditions related to, and descended from, them.

Ayyavazhi

Main article: Ayyavazhi

Bhakti Movement

Main article: Bhakti Movement

Buddhism

Main article: Schools of Buddhism

Din-i-Ilahi

Hinduism

See also: Hindu denominations

Major schools and movements of Hindu philosophy

Main article: Hindu philosophy

Jainism

Main article: Jainism

Sikhism

Main article: Sikhism

Iranian religions

Main article: Iranian religions

Manichaeism

Mazdakism

Yazdânism

Zoroastrianism

Mithraism

East Asian religions

Main article: East Asian religions

Confucianism

Main article: Confucianism

Shinto

Main articles: Shinto and Shinto sects and schools

Taoism

Main article: Taoism

Other

African diasporic religions

African diasporic religions are a number of related religions that developed in the Americas among African slaves and their descendants in various countries of the Caribbean Islands and Latin America, as well as parts of the southern United States. They derive from African traditional religions, especially of West and Central Africa, showing similarities to the Yoruba religion in particular.

See also: African diasporic religions

Indigenous traditional religions

See also: Paganism and Folk religion

Traditionally, these faiths have all been classified "Pagan", but scholars prefer the terms "indigenous/primal/folk/ethnic religions".

African

Main article: African traditional religions

West Africa

Central Africa

East Africa

Southern Africa

American

Main article: Native American mythology

Eurasian

Main article: Eurasian Indigenous Religions

Asian

European

Oceania/Pacific

Cargo cults

Main article: Cargo cults

Historical polytheism

Further information: Prehistoric religion and History of religion

Ancient Near Eastern

Main article: Ancient Near Eastern religions

Indo-European

Main article: Proto-Indo-European religion

Hellenistic

Main article: Hellenistic religion

Neopaganism

Main article: List of Neopagan movements

New Age, esotericism, mysticism

New Age

Main article: New Age

Esotericism and mysticism

Main articles: Esotericism and Mysticism

Occult and magical

Main articles: Occultism, Magic (paranormal), and Magick

Left-Hand Path

Main article: Left-Hand Path and Right-Hand Path

New religious movements

Main article: List of new religious movements

Creativity

Shinshukyo

Main article: Shinshūkyō

Fictional religions

Main article: List of fictional religions

Parody or mock religions

Others

Other categorisations

By demographics

Main article: Religious demographics

By area

Further information: Religion geography

See also

External links

[hide]v · d · eReligion topics

 

 

Major groups

Abrahamic

Bahá'í Faith · Christianity (Catholicism, Jehovah's Witness, Latter Day Saint movement, Orthodoxy, Protestanism, Unitarianism· Druze · Islam (Sunni, Shia, Sufi· Judaism (Conservative, Karaite, Orthodox, Reform)

 

 

Indian

Ayyavazhi · Buddhism (Theravada, Mahayana, Vajrayana· Hinduism (Shaktism, Shaivism, Smartism, Vaishnavism· Jainism · Sikhism

 

 

Iranian

Ahl-e Haqq · Bahá'í Faith · Manichaeism · Mazdak · Mithraism · Yazidi · Zoroastrianism (and Zurvanism)

 

 

East Asian

Confucianism · Shinto · Taoism · Zen

 

 

Yoruba

Aladura · Candomblé · Santería · Umbanda

 

 

Recent

Cao Dai · Cheondoism · Discordianism · I-Kuan Tao · Neopaganism · New Age · Rastafari · Scientology · Seicho-no-Ie · Tenrikyo · New Thought · Unitarian Universalism

 

 

Indigenous religion

African · Afro-American · Indigenous Australian · Chinese · Finnish-Estonian · Gurung · Javanese · Malagasy · Native American · Odinani · Philippine · Tibetan (Bön) · Polynesian · Vodou

 

 

Ancient religions

Prehistoric

Paleolithic

 

 

Near East

Egyptian · Mesopotamian · Semitic

 

 

Indo-European

Celtic · Germanic · Greek (Gnosticism · Neoplatonism· Illyro-thracian · Mithraism · Roman · Slavic · Vedic Hinduism

 

 

Turkic

Tengriism

 

 

Aspects

Apostasy / Disaffiliation · Beliefs · Clergy · Conversion · Deities · Denomination · Faith · God · Meditation · Monasticism (monk · nun· Mysticism · Mythology · Ordination · Orthodoxy · Orthopraxy · Ritual (liturgy · sacrifice· Spirituality · Supernatural · Symbols · Truth

 

 

Theism

Animism · Deism · Monotheism · Nontheism · Panentheism · Pantheism · Polytheism · Transtheism

 

 

Religious studies

Anthropology · Comparative · Development · Evolutionary origin · History · Philosophy · Psychology · Sociology · Theology · Theories · Women

 

 

Religion and
society

Agriculture · Business · Clergy (Monasticism · Ordination· Conversion (Evangelism · Missionary · Proselytism· Education · Fanaticism · Freedom (Pluralism · Syncretism · Toleration · Universalism· Fundamentalism · Growth · Happiness · Homosexuality · Minorities · National church · Neo-fascism · Political science · Populations · Schism · Science · State · Theocracy · Vegetarianism · Violence (Persecution · Terrorism · War· Wealth

 

 

Secularism
and irreligion

Deism · Agnosticism · Atheism · Criticism · Deconstruction · Irreligion by country · Secular theology · Secularization · Separation of church and state · Unaffiliated

 

 

Lists

Index · Outline · Timeline · Abrahamic prophets · Deification · Deities · Founders · Mass gatherings · New religious movements · Organizations · Religions and spiritual traditions · Scholars